Author Archives: CAMM

About CAMM

Administrator, Council of American Maritime Museums

Door County Maritime Museum Seeks Executive Director

2009 DCMM hi-resBob Desh is retiring at the end of the year so Door County Maritime Museum is seeking a new dynamic, passionate and highly skilled Executive Director to lead the organization into its exciting future. Dedicated to the preservation and celebration of the maritime history and heritage of the Great Lakes with a focus on Wisconsin’s Door Peninsula, the Museum includes a 20,000 square foot flagship facility in Sturgeon Bay, the museum tug John Purves, the historic Cana Island Lighthouse, and a smaller seasonal museum in Gills Rock near the shores of the famous Port des Morts (“Death’s Door”) passage at the Peninsula’s northern tip.

Responsibilities:

  • Provide leadership, inspiration, and focus for the organization as a whole.
  • Work with the Board of Directors to create support for the organization in the community.
  • Manage the organization’s budget.
  • Oversee the senior staff responsible for core programs including development, marketing, finance, and administration.
  • Act as primary spokesperson for organization.
  • Develop and maintain effective partnerships.
  • Evaluate program accomplishments based on results-driven targets.

Skills and Attributes:

  • Results-driven leadership and management experience, particularly in the non-profit sector. Experience in a maritime-related field a plus.
  • Proven success in building consensus among diverse constituencies.
  • Demonstrated skills in community-building initiatives.
  • Successful experience working with and building an active, engaged board of directors.
  • Excellent oral and written communications skills.
  • Well-developed understanding of the use and value of technology in non-profit operations.

Complete job description provided upon request. To apply, send resume and cover letter describing relevant skills and attributes by September 22, 2014 to:

Door County Maritime Museum

120 N. Madison Ave.

Sturgeon Bay, WI 54235

Or by email to: szeyher@dcmm.org

Great Lakes Fisheries Heritage Trails Conference

fisheriesScheduled for September 8 – 9 in South Haven, Michigan, this conference will explore and celebrate our Great Lakes fisheries heritage as a means to promote coastal tourism development. opportunities.

Discover how our valuable Great Lakes fisheries (past, present, and future) can benefit local museum programs, enhance coastal tourism development opportunities, and support community development efforts. Learn more about Michigan’s Great Lakes Fisheries Heritage Consortium projects and partnerships, including current opportunities toward designating a statewide fisheries heritage tourism trail.

Sponsored by the Great Lakes Fisheries Heritage Consortium, Michigan Sea GrantMichigan State University ExtensionMichigan State University and the Michigan Maritime Museum.

Maritime Historian Job Opening

The National Park Service is advertising for a maritime historian. The position is located in the Park History Program in Washington, D.C.  The duties are described as “Manages the Maritime History Program with the Maritime Administration (MARAD). Provides the Maritime History Program leadership and coordination. Formulates Servicewide strategies, goals and objectives. Acts as an advocate for and provides expertise relating to NPS maritime history in all of its forms including maritime landscapes, traditional cultural properties, ships, lighthouses, life saving stations, underwater resources, riverboats, inland lakes and canals, etc. Consults with and shares expertise with Federal and State agencies with maritime resources, such as the MARAD, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Coast Guard, Department of Defense and other agencies.” 

For more information see the listing on the USAJobs website.  Note that the application deadline is July 31.

Mariners’ Museum receives key components from Oracle’s America’s Cup winner

 

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The Mariners’ Museum recently received a donation from Oracle Team USA of parts from its 2013 America’s Cup-winning catamaran. The donation included one of the revolutionary “J”-foil daggerboards, which lifted the 72-foot catamaran from the water at high speeds, as well as a replacement bow section.

Newport News, VA – The Mariners’ Museum has received a donation of key components from the 2013 America’s Cup-winning Oracle Team USA catamaran. The donation included one of the revolutionary “J”-foil daggerboards, which lifted the 72-foot catamaran from the water at high speeds.

The gift is the culmination of a conversation that began in February between Mariners’ Museum Chief Curator Lyles Forbes and Oracle Team USA. Forbes initially set his sights on one of the smaller AC45 catamarans used in the America’s Cup World Series.

Oracle Team responded that it couldn’t accommodate Forbes’ request – because the AC45 was still an active class. But Oracle surprised him by offering a much bigger prize – pieces from the Cup-winning AC72.

“I was hugely ecstatic,” said Forbes, a longtime fan of competitive sailing who attended the 2013 America’s Cup regatta in San Francisco. “I didn’t even consider that in the realm of possibility.”

Oracle Team USA’s successful defense of the America’s Cup last year is considered one of the greatest comebacks in sports history. The team came from an 8-1 deficit to beat Emirates Team New Zealand.

The boat’s “J”-shaped foiling daggerboards work like airplane wings, lifting the massive catamaran from the water as it reaches high speeds. The winning 72-foot catamaran sailed at more than 50 miles per hour during the 2013 America’s Cup regatta. . The 35th defense of the Cup will be in 2017.

“The J-foils made the difference,” Forbes said. “They literally raised America’s Cup to a whole new level.”

In addition to donating one of the large “J” foils, Oracle Team USA also provided a replacement bow section, and a “T” foil rudder from the smaller AC45 class as well as some crew gear.

A new display is being planned for the International Small Craft Center, alongside one of the earliest sailing hydrofoils – Monitor, which was a project between the U.S. Navy and Baker Manufacturing in the late 1950s.

Maine Maritime Museum’s New Blacksmith Exhibit

Architectural rendering of blacksmith exhibit at Maine Maritime Museum

Architectural rendering of blacksmith exhibit at Maine Maritime Museum

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Opening Day – August 15, 2014. Photo by Candace Clifford

BATH, Maine, July 22…When the ribbon is cut for the Kenneth D. Kramer Blacksmith Shop Exhibit during a member’s reception on Friday, August 15, it will mark the latest transformative addition to Maine Maritime Museum’s campus and will complete the curated story of the historic Percy & Small Shipyard, part of the museum’s campus and a remarkable story in Maine’s maritime heritage.

From 1894 to 1920, the Percy & Small Shipyard built an astonishing 41 four- five- and six-mast schooners.  Of only 11 six-mast wooden schooners ever built in the Americas, 7 were constructed at the P&S yard including Wyoming, largest of them all. When the P&S site was donated to the museum in 1975, it was remarkably intact, the only U.S. shipyard that built large wooden sailing vessels that still had original buildings. The only one missing was the blacksmith shop.

“While it may seem surprising that a blacksmith shop would be an important part of a wooden vessel shipyard,Wyoming was built with more than 300 tons of iron and steel,” says Amy Lent, the museum’s executive director.  “In addition to the anchor and usual metal fastenings and fittings present in all ships, the huge wooden ship’s hull could not have borne the incredible pressures created by the 6,000 long tons of coal in her holds without the iron strapping that kept her timbers in place.”

During the 26 years that the P&S shipyard was in business, there were two different buildings that served as the blacksmith shop. The first, which outfitted all of the six-mast schooners, was destroyed by fire in 1913 – not an unusual occurrence for wooden buildings housing open forges in an environment filled with wood shavings and sawdust. Very little information is available about the interior of that building and few clear exterior photos exist. The shop contained at least one forge and also a boiler for the yard’s steam box for making heavy planking pliable. The second blacksmith shop building was torn down in 1939, long after P&S had ceased operation.

Opening day - August 15, 2014. Photo by Candace Clifford

Opening day – August 15, 2014. Photo by Candace Clifford

The exhibit approximates the original building’s dimensions of 84 x 26 feet and location due east of the Paint & Treenail Shop. To preserve the integrity of the shipyard’s original historic buildings, the new structure is not an attempt at a historical recreation of the original building. Instead, the proportions, dimensions and materials used evoke the original building and its purpose while clearly being a contemporary structure.

While the open design permits expansive views of the P&S shipyard and the Kennebec River, an innovative combination of corrugated weathering steel (which oxidizes to a rust-colored finish) and rough-cut wood framing was selected to reference shipbuilding materials.

The structure houses exhibits related to the blacksmith activities that took place there while also providing a gathering place for functions and visitors.  On occasion, blacksmithing demonstrations will be conducted in the building.

Replacing the blacksmith ship was a vision of former MMM Trustee Kenneth D. Kramer, who passed away in 2009 leaving a generous bequest that included funds to construct a Blacksmith Shop building. Thanks entirely to Ken the complete shipbuilding story of the great schooners can now be told, and so the new exhibit building bears his name.