Category Archives: News

Tahoe Maritime Museum Seeks Curator

Tahoe Maritime Museum (TMM), Homewood, California, seeks an experienced, creative professional for the position of Curator. Reporting to the Executive Director, the Curator’s principal responsibilities are the care and management of the Museum’s artifact and archival collections. The job also entails researching artifacts and historical themes for the development of exhibits and programs. This position requires the ability to collaborate closely with the other members of the Museum staff and volunteers, and interact effectively with community members and the general public.

Application deadline is October 15, 2014.

Full announcement – TMM Curator Job Posting 2014

 

South Street Seaport Museum Seeks Director of Operations

South Street Seaport Museum, located in a 12 block historic district, once the city’s main port, is dedicated to preserving and interpreting the history of New York as a port city. The Museum houses a major collection of maritime art and artifacts and comprehensive archival materials related to the Port of New York. It owns and operates a large fleet of historic ships, including two large square-riggers, PEKING and WAVERTREE, three operating vessels, PIONEER, LETTIE G. HOWARD, and W.O.DECKER, and the lightship AMBROSE. The Museum offers innovative programs, exhibitions and educational opportunities to diverse communities both ashore and afloat.

South Street Seaport Museum, located in a 12 block historic district, once the city’s main port, is dedicated to preserving and interpreting the history of New York as a port city. The Museum houses a major collection of maritime art and artifacts and comprehensive archival materials related to the Port of New York. It owns and operates a large fleet of historic ships, including two large square-riggers, PEKING and WAVERTREE, three operating vessels, PIONEER, LETTIE G. HOWARD, and W.O.DECKER (above), and the lightship AMBROSE. The Museum offers innovative programs, exhibitions and educational opportunities to diverse communities both ashore and afloat.

South Street Seaport Museum seeks a Director of Operations to oversee administration, front of house operations, event logistics, and internal processes and procedures. As part of a small, hard-working team, this position leads and supports all departments including Visitor Services, Historic Retail Shops, IT, Marketing, Development and Membership, Education, Programs, Facilities, and Collections.

For more information: Director of Operations Job Description 2014

New Exhibit Hall Planned for Mystic Seaport

Rendering of the new exhibit hall courtesy Mystic Seaport

Rendering of the new exhibit hall courtesy Mystic Seaport

Mystic — Mystic Seaport has applied for permission to construct a state-of-the-art exhibition hall on the north end of the Museum grounds. The new building will greatly expand the institution’s capability to host large exhibits and will be the cornerstone for an improved year-round experience for the visitor.

To see the full release goto http://www.mysticseaport.org/news/2014/a-new-exhibit-hall/

Great Lakes Fisheries Heritage Trails Conference

fisheriesScheduled for September 8 – 9 in South Haven, Michigan, this conference will explore and celebrate our Great Lakes fisheries heritage as a means to promote coastal tourism development. opportunities.

Discover how our valuable Great Lakes fisheries (past, present, and future) can benefit local museum programs, enhance coastal tourism development opportunities, and support community development efforts. Learn more about Michigan’s Great Lakes Fisheries Heritage Consortium projects and partnerships, including current opportunities toward designating a statewide fisheries heritage tourism trail.

Sponsored by the Great Lakes Fisheries Heritage Consortium, Michigan Sea GrantMichigan State University ExtensionMichigan State University and the Michigan Maritime Museum.

Maine Maritime Museum’s New Blacksmith Exhibit

Architectural rendering of blacksmith exhibit at Maine Maritime Museum

Architectural rendering of blacksmith exhibit at Maine Maritime Museum

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Opening Day – August 15, 2014. Photo by Candace Clifford

BATH, Maine, July 22…When the ribbon is cut for the Kenneth D. Kramer Blacksmith Shop Exhibit during a member’s reception on Friday, August 15, it will mark the latest transformative addition to Maine Maritime Museum’s campus and will complete the curated story of the historic Percy & Small Shipyard, part of the museum’s campus and a remarkable story in Maine’s maritime heritage.

From 1894 to 1920, the Percy & Small Shipyard built an astonishing 41 four- five- and six-mast schooners.  Of only 11 six-mast wooden schooners ever built in the Americas, 7 were constructed at the P&S yard including Wyoming, largest of them all. When the P&S site was donated to the museum in 1975, it was remarkably intact, the only U.S. shipyard that built large wooden sailing vessels that still had original buildings. The only one missing was the blacksmith shop.

“While it may seem surprising that a blacksmith shop would be an important part of a wooden vessel shipyard,Wyoming was built with more than 300 tons of iron and steel,” says Amy Lent, the museum’s executive director.  “In addition to the anchor and usual metal fastenings and fittings present in all ships, the huge wooden ship’s hull could not have borne the incredible pressures created by the 6,000 long tons of coal in her holds without the iron strapping that kept her timbers in place.”

During the 26 years that the P&S shipyard was in business, there were two different buildings that served as the blacksmith shop. The first, which outfitted all of the six-mast schooners, was destroyed by fire in 1913 – not an unusual occurrence for wooden buildings housing open forges in an environment filled with wood shavings and sawdust. Very little information is available about the interior of that building and few clear exterior photos exist. The shop contained at least one forge and also a boiler for the yard’s steam box for making heavy planking pliable. The second blacksmith shop building was torn down in 1939, long after P&S had ceased operation.

Opening day - August 15, 2014. Photo by Candace Clifford

Opening day – August 15, 2014. Photo by Candace Clifford

The exhibit approximates the original building’s dimensions of 84 x 26 feet and location due east of the Paint & Treenail Shop. To preserve the integrity of the shipyard’s original historic buildings, the new structure is not an attempt at a historical recreation of the original building. Instead, the proportions, dimensions and materials used evoke the original building and its purpose while clearly being a contemporary structure.

While the open design permits expansive views of the P&S shipyard and the Kennebec River, an innovative combination of corrugated weathering steel (which oxidizes to a rust-colored finish) and rough-cut wood framing was selected to reference shipbuilding materials.

The structure houses exhibits related to the blacksmith activities that took place there while also providing a gathering place for functions and visitors.  On occasion, blacksmithing demonstrations will be conducted in the building.

Replacing the blacksmith ship was a vision of former MMM Trustee Kenneth D. Kramer, who passed away in 2009 leaving a generous bequest that included funds to construct a Blacksmith Shop building. Thanks entirely to Ken the complete shipbuilding story of the great schooners can now be told, and so the new exhibit building bears his name.