Category Archives: Small Craft

Museum Small Craft Association Annual Meeting

mscaThe 2015 Museum Small Craft Association annual meeting will be held Monday, October 5 and Tuesday, October 6 at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in Saint Michaels, Maryland. Museum small craft professionals and others who share an interest in small boat conservation and restoration, skills preservation, documentation, history, interpretation and research are invited to meet, learn about recent developments, exchange ideas, and talk with their peers. The MSCA meeting follows the Mid-Atlantic Small Craft Festival which will be held on Friday, October 2 through Sunday, October 4.

The meeting program will include presentations and discussions on a variety of small craft and museum related topics, opportunities for informal discussions, a dinner on Monday evening, and a visit to a local boatbuilder.  Please let Richard Scofield rscofield@cbmm.org know if there is a topic you are interested in, or if you’d like to make a presentation or lead a discussion.

The museum has reserved a block of rooms for Sunday night through Tuesday night at the St Michaels Inn (formerly Best Western St Michaels) which is 2 miles from the museum. Rate is $89.99 / night. Phone number is 410-745-3333. Ask for a room in the Museum Small Craft Association block.  St Michaels also has several other inns and bed & breakfast establishments, and accommodations are also available in Easton, approximately 12 miles from the museum. Camping on the museum grounds will not be available during the MSCA Meeting.

The MSCA meeting follows the Mid-Atlantic Small Craft Festival which will be held from the evening of Friday evening, October 2 through mid-day on Sunday, October 4. MASCF participants bring a wide variety of traditional boats. Activities include workshops, demonstrations, a sailing race which typically includes boats from small dinghies to a log canoe, row and paddling races for both adults and children, and model boat building for children with an opportunity to sail the models in a small pond in addition to general messing about in the boats. Registration for MASCF is separate from MSCA Meeting registration, and MASCF participants may camp on the museum grounds for MASCF only.

The Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum is located on 18 waterfront acres and occupies 35 buildings, 12 of which house exhibits open to the public.. The Museum offers exhibits, demonstrations, boat rides on the Miles River, and annual festivals that celebrate Chesapeake Bay culture, boats, seafood, and history. The Museum’s fleet of historic Chesapeake Bay watercraft is the largest in existence with 11 vessels on floating display at the Museum’s docks, and its small boat collection includes crabbing skiffs, workboats, and log canoes. The fleet is maintained in the public’s eye by master shipwrights and their apprentices.

For more information about the meeting and the Museum Small Craft Association visit www.museumsmallcraft.org or contact David Cockey davidcockey@gmail.com

For more information about the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum visit http://www.cbmm.org

Submitted by David Cockey, July 13, 2015; updated July 20, 2015

Kenyan dhow sails into the International Small Craft Center

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Photo courtesy of The Mariners’ Museum.

Newport News, VA – The Mariners’ Museum & Park is pleased to announce the newest addition to its International Small Craft Center–Lamu, a sailing dhow from Kenya, is fully rigged and on display. There are now 42 countries represented in the center.

This newly donated boat is a jahazi–a type of dhow built in Lamu, Kenya. This dhow was an ocean-going trader sailed by a crew of 10 to 12. It operated along the East African coast from Mogadishu, Somalia to Tanzanian ports and as far east as Mumbai, India. Lamu was built by Ali Abdalla Skanda’s father in 2004. Ali’s family includes craftsmen and merchants whose trade reached as far as Egypt and Arabia. He carries on the traditional art of building and sailing dhows that he learned from his father.

This boat, built and used around the island of Lamu, was recently brought to the United States as part of the annual Folklife Festival, organized by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife, on the Mall in Washington DC.

“Having a true dhow in our collection is vitally important to the overall story that The Mariners’ Museum is uniquely equipped to tell: mankind’s relationship with the sea” said chief curator Lyles Forbes. “We have models and images of dhows in the collection, but there’s nothing like an authentic, full-size boat to truly highlight important stories of early travel on the sea.”

The International Small Craft Center is a 17,500 square foot facility houses a collection that features nearly 150 boats from 42 countries. The boats are from diverse cultures and waterways and are arranged around the Center in eleven thematic areas. The Center also takes visitors on a journey beyond the boat and helps them discover the individuals who used the small craft.

The Mariners’ Museum, an educational, non-profit institution accredited by the American Alliance of Museums, preserves and interprets maritime history through an international collection of ship models, figureheads, paintings and other maritime artifacts. For hours and information, visit www.MarinersMuseum.org, call (757) 596-2222 or write to The Mariners’ Museum, 100 Museum Drive, Newport News, VA 23606.

Center for Wooden Boats Seeks Home for Historic Canoe

club canoe1The Center for Wooden boats in Seattle, WA, is looking for a new home for this late 19th century club canoe. It is about 25’LOA. It was found and brought to CWB in the 1980s from Vancouver, CA, though likely built in Ontario in the late 1880s.

CWB is reaching out far and wide to find a good home for this canoe. Please contact me if your organization has any interest.

Kyle Hunter
Collection Manager
The Center for Wooden Boats
khunter@cwb.org

Mariners’ Museum receives key components from Oracle’s America’s Cup winner

 

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The Mariners’ Museum recently received a donation from Oracle Team USA of parts from its 2013 America’s Cup-winning catamaran. The donation included one of the revolutionary “J”-foil daggerboards, which lifted the 72-foot catamaran from the water at high speeds, as well as a replacement bow section.

Newport News, VA – The Mariners’ Museum has received a donation of key components from the 2013 America’s Cup-winning Oracle Team USA catamaran. The donation included one of the revolutionary “J”-foil daggerboards, which lifted the 72-foot catamaran from the water at high speeds.

The gift is the culmination of a conversation that began in February between Mariners’ Museum Chief Curator Lyles Forbes and Oracle Team USA. Forbes initially set his sights on one of the smaller AC45 catamarans used in the America’s Cup World Series.

Oracle Team responded that it couldn’t accommodate Forbes’ request – because the AC45 was still an active class. But Oracle surprised him by offering a much bigger prize – pieces from the Cup-winning AC72.

“I was hugely ecstatic,” said Forbes, a longtime fan of competitive sailing who attended the 2013 America’s Cup regatta in San Francisco. “I didn’t even consider that in the realm of possibility.”

Oracle Team USA’s successful defense of the America’s Cup last year is considered one of the greatest comebacks in sports history. The team came from an 8-1 deficit to beat Emirates Team New Zealand.

The boat’s “J”-shaped foiling daggerboards work like airplane wings, lifting the massive catamaran from the water as it reaches high speeds. The winning 72-foot catamaran sailed at more than 50 miles per hour during the 2013 America’s Cup regatta. . The 35th defense of the Cup will be in 2017.

“The J-foils made the difference,” Forbes said. “They literally raised America’s Cup to a whole new level.”

In addition to donating one of the large “J” foils, Oracle Team USA also provided a replacement bow section, and a “T” foil rudder from the smaller AC45 class as well as some crew gear.

A new display is being planned for the International Small Craft Center, alongside one of the earliest sailing hydrofoils – Monitor, which was a project between the U.S. Navy and Baker Manufacturing in the late 1950s.

2014 Ed Monk Scholarship Award

The deadline for applications for the 2014 Ed Monk Scholarship Award has been extended to May 1. The Award was established to provide educational opportunities for professionals working in traditional maritime trades. This year, for the first time, interns also are eligible to receive the scholarship. The mission of the award is to further maritime professionals’ and interns’ knowledge of traditional marine trades in other cultures. Study and research may include current and historical methods of boat construction using different materials, designs based on the functions to be served by the boats, materials available for construction and the state of technology.

The Center for Wooden Boats (CWB), Seattle, Washington is seeking applications from qualified persons. Applications now are due on or before May 1, 2014. The applicant should explain how the project will enrich the existing knowledge of the applicant and how the funds would be used. The budget for the grant may include transportation, housing, and other appropriate expenses. The background of the applicant in traditional marine trades and a list of references also are required.

Decisions by the application committee will be made by or before May 15, 2014. Funds granted must be used within one year of the award. A written report of the activities and benefit derived from the experience must be submitted to CWB.

Grants awarded will total $1,500.

The award was named to honor Ed Monk, a prominent and respected boat designer and builder in the Northwest. The Fund was established by John M. Goodfellow, who has participated in the hands-on-history activities at The Center for Wooden Boats. He is an advocate of preserving traditional maritime skills and wishes to encourage this through studies of those traditional skills being carried on beyond the applicants’ local regions and local knowledge.

The application committee consists of the donor and CWB Founding Director Dick Wagner. Applicants can be of any locality, wishing to study indigenous designs, materials and techniques of other areas.

For more information, contact CWB Founding Director Dick Wagner at CWB at (206) 382-2628, dick@cwb.org.

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The Center for Wooden Boats, founded in 1976, provides a gathering place where maritime history comes alive through direct experience and our small craft heritage is enjoyed, preserved, and passed along to future generations. CWB, with locations on Lake Union in Seattle and at Cama Beach State Park on Camano Island, engages visitors in whole body learning by putting the historic boats, oars and paddles, sails and tools in the hands of people who visit. To learn more about year-round maritime activities at Seattle’s Lake Union Park visit http://www.AtLakeUnionPark.org