USCG Report on Bounty Sinking

U.S. COAST GUARD RELEASES REPORT OF INVESTIGATION OF THE SINKING OF THE TALL SHIP BOUNTY

WASHINGTON — Today the U.S. Coast Guard released its report of investigation of the October 2012 sinking of the tall ship Bounty, during which one crewmember died and another remains missing and is presumed dead, off the coast of Cape Hatteras, N.C.

The findings in the report conclude that a combination of faulty management and crew risk assessment procedures contributed to the sinking. Specifically, choosing to navigate a vessel in insufficient material condition  in close proximity to an approaching hurricane with an inexperienced crew was highlighted.

As a result of the investigation, the report recommends that the Coast Guard
review the existing policy for attraction vessels, including vessel manning
and operating status. The report also lists such recommendations as that the HMS Bounty Organization establish organizational policy that dictates vessel operational parameters based on weather, sea state or destination, and also establish organizational policy and requirements for hiring of a professional engineer in the event they operate a vessel in the future.

NHA Hires Michael R. Harrison as Robyn & John Davis Chief Curator

NHA_Chief CuratorThe Nantucket Historical Association (NHA) is pleased to announce the hiring of Michael R. Harrison in the position of Robyn & John Davis Chief Curator. Harrison will officially begin his duties in his new role on Monday, June 30, 2014.

“The collections and properties of the NHA provide a welcome opportunity to combine my interests in maritime, social, and architectural history,” says Harrison. “I’m excited to work with my new colleagues to create exciting exhibitions and programs that link local stories and the local built environment to regional, national, and even international themes and developments.”

“The history of whaling has been featured in other museum projects I’ve done, so the island’s historic importance is very familiar,” says Harrison. “I’m looking forward to diving more deeply into the many aspects of Nantucket’s history and seeing what stories we at the NHA can tell about the island and its people over time.”

In his position as Robyn & John Davis Chief Curator, Harrison will head the curatorial and historic properties departments and have oversight of the association’s collections and exhibition programs, including its historic properties. He will be responsible for the management, care, research and interpretation of the NHA holdings in the fine and decorative arts, historic and prehistoric artifacts, historic structures and NHA Research Library holdings.

The American Lightship Museum Opens

Cutting the ribbon on the Overfalls Foundation’s new American Lightship Museum from the left: Museum Curator Ray Glick, Mayor Ted Becker, Foundation Ship & Grounds Chair Bill Reader, Past President Dave Bernheisel and President Tracy Mulveny

Cutting the ribbon on the Overfalls Foundation’s new American Lightship Museum from the left: Museum Curator Ray Glick, Mayor Ted Becker, Foundation Ship & Grounds Chair Bill Reader, Past President Dave Bernheisel and President Tracy Mulveny

The Overfalls Foundation in Lewes, Delaware announced the opening of the American Lightship Museum at a ceremony on June 4, 2014. The Foundation is also the home of the Lightship Overfalls (LV-118), a recently designated National Historic Landmark, and the Delaware Maritime Hall of Fame.

The new museum will work in conjunction with the lightship, at the same location, to tell the story of the American lightships and the crews who served aboard them. Foundation president Tracy Mulveny said, “This is something that has been in our plans for a long time and this year we were able to put all of the pieces of the puzzle together. First, the Lightship Sailors Association donated their collection of artifacts to us to put on display. Then, we were given the pilot house from the Stephanie Anne, a 1955 vintage fishing boat that was being rebuilt which we were able to restore and use to house the artifacts. Our local community, which has always been supportive of our mission, made it possible to incorporate the new structure in our existing building complex. Finally, with contributions of funds and building materials from generous donors, our volunteer work force took over and made it all happen.”

In addition to telling the lightship story, the museum houses some significant and unique artifacts such as the hawsehole from LV-1, the first numbered U.S. lightship, and the last American flag to fly over a U.S. lightship completing a full tour in service. The Foundation also seeks additional artifacts to supplement the collection and better tell the lightship story. Any individuals who might be able to assist in adding to the collection are asked to contact the museum curator Ray Glick on (847) 732-2988 or by e-mail at GlickRay@Gmail.com.

The museum’s open hours will coincide with that of the lightship which is seasonal from Memorial Day through Columbus Day. As with the lightship, special museum tours are available on request. For the latest information and special tours refer to the Foundation’s web site WWW.Overfalls.org.

Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum Selects New President

Courtesy of Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum

Courtesy of Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum

The Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum (CBMM) has announced Kristen Greenaway of Durham, NC will serve as the fifth President of the 49-year old non-profit institution. Current CBMM President Langley Shook announced his retirement in late 2013, and will remain on board until Greenaway’s start, which is anticipated in early July.

Greenaway brings a wide range of professional experience to the position, including a core background leading non-profits in a development capacity.

With 20 years non-profit experience, Greenaway brings 12 years serving in a museum leadership and development role to the position. She currently serves as the Director of Development and External Relations at Duke University’s Nasher Museum of Art. Her experience also includes serving as Director of Development at Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society; as Director of Events and Communications at Sally Ride Science in San Diego; and the Executive Director of the San Diego Sea to Sea Trail Foundation. In addition, Greenaway brings extensive development experience with educational institutions through her work with the Rotterdam School of Management Erasmus University, Rotterdam; University College London in New York and London; and Sidney Sussex College at Cambridge University, Cambridge. She earned her Master of Social Sciences and Bachelor of Arts degrees from the University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand and is a candidate for a Master of Arts degree from Duke University.

            “This appointment comes at such a critical time for the museum,” said CBMM Board of Governors Chair Tom Seip. “CBMM is implementing its new five-year plan which includes a major fundraising campaign and many new initiatives to give people more reasons to connect with the Bay through us. Langley has done a fantastic job of navigating the museum through the great recession, and Kristen now will take the helm to steer the museum to the next level.”

            “We are extremely pleased to welcome Kristen to the museum,” added CBMM Governor Richard Bodorff, who led CBMM’s new president search committee. “Kristen was selected from a field of more than 30 highly qualified candidates. Over the last six months, the search process included interviews by our search committee, current and alumni board, and several staff members. Even among such a diverse group, the consensus that Kristen was our outstanding candidate was felt unanimously.” To conduct the search, CBMM retained the services of ByalaSearch of New York, which specializes in executive searches for non-profits.

            Born and raised in New Zealand, Greenaway spent part of her youth with her parents and two siblings living aboard a 32-foot wooden yacht her father built. “Messing about in boats has been an underlying focus of my entire life,” says Greenaway. While finishing a Master’s degree in Social Sciences at the University of Waikato, Hamilton in New Zealand, Greenaway rebuilt an 18-foot William Garden keeler. Greenaway left New Zealand in 1989, crewing on a 60-foot ketch for the inaugural two-month Auckland-Fukuoka (Japan) Yacht Race. Her passion for all things maritime has continued throughout her life, and currently Greenaway takes part in—and often wins—the WaterTribe Everglades Kayak Challenge, which is an annual, 300-nautical mile, day/night sail kayak event from Tampa to the Florida Keys. Greenaway moved to the United States in 1998, working in New York, California, and most recently North Carolina. She is a citizen of the United States, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom.

            “I met Kristen early in the interviewing process and was immediately impressed by her,” said retiring CBMM President Langley Shook. “She’s charming and engaging. With her fundraising and leadership experience in museums and her enthusiasm for authentic experiences, I’m confident she’ll be a perfect fit for our museum.”

            The museum is planning to celebrate the accomplishments of retiring President Langley Shook with “Langley Shook Day” on Saturday, June 14, with the public invited to a brief presentation planned for 1 p.m. under the Hooper Strait Lighthouse, and to witness the 1955 skipjack Rosie Parks head out to the Miles River at 1:45 p.m. for one of her first sails in nearly 20 years. The Miles River Yacht Club Foundation of St. Michaels also honored Shook with itsDistinguished Service Award at a May 18 reception. Once retired, Shook plans to remain active in the community and with the museum.

            “I feel honored that the Board has entrusted me with the stewardship of CBMM, and I look forward to building upon the success of my predecessors and shepherding the museum into the next 50 years,” commented Greenaway. “CBMM is truly the treasure of all Eastern Shore residents, and I am excited to further extend our relationship with our diverse local community.” Greenaway plans to relocate to Talbot County with her family as she begins her new role as CBMM’s President this July.

            For more information about the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum, visit www.cbmm.org or call 410-745-2916.

Update on South Street Seaport

The following was shared at the recent CAMM meeting by Ron Oswald

Courtesy South Street Seaport Museum

Courtesy South Street Seaport Museum

South Street Seaport Museum continues and is, by many measures, alive and well! Just off a highly successful Spring Revival weekend, two of the larger ships are once again open to the public, the 1911 PEKING and the 1907 AMBROSE, the latter with new interpretation. This represents the largest open-ship operation for the museum in some years and is the result of more than $280,000 spent in AMBROSE and significant preparations in PEKING. Although the galleries in Schermerhorn Row remain closed after Hurricane Sandy, the Museum is striding forward on a number of levels including: 

  • Open ships on Pier 16 (PEKING and AMBROSE)
  • Education programs in Schermerhorn Row, the district, the Bowne Shops, and aboard the ships
  • Active printing and education in Bowne & Co., Stationers, Bowne Printers, and woodcarving and model building in the Maritime Crafts Center.
  • The schooner PIONEER readying for another season of her award-winning education programs on New York Harbor and farther afield
  • The schooner LETTIE G. HOWARD readying for a collaborative season with New York Harbor School and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey as a flagship and education platform
  • The 1885 ship WAVERTREE is in a bidding process for a city-funded $5.2 million project of hull plate replacements, reinstallation of the ‘tweendeck, and replacement of the weather deck. She will return to Pier 16 in 2015 and become the principal centerpiece of the fleet
  • The highly popular volunteer program is alive and thriving and despite a slight dip in hours in 2013 (owing to closed galleries) the program is now on track to best many recent years in hours and is clearly strong, vibrant, and full of enthusiastic supporters

It’s no secret that SSSM faces serious challenges both in the post-Sandy climate and with respect to rampant development in the Seaport district. But there are some very bright spots. A working group of stakeholders, convened by elected officials at both the state and local levels and including the Borough President, continues to work on recommendations for appropriate development in the district and the long-term health of the Museum. The recent Spring Revival was attended by the Manhattan Borough President, the Seaport’s City Councilmember, the Community Board Chair, the Commissioner of Cultural Affairs, and numerous corporate and individual sponsors, not to mention a robust group of volunteers, members, neighbors, and friends of the Museum. 

All of this makes one thing very clear. Although the specifics of the Seaport Museum’s future remain somewhat undefined, there is little doubt that the Museum will once again thrive. It has become evident in the past year and a half since Sandy that the residents of the Seaport district and the city of New York through its elected officials are aware of the import of the Seaport and its story of trade, of immigration, of the growth of the greatest maritime city in America, and in fact the story of America herself. 

I look forward to joining CAMM at the next meeting and hope at that time to be able to offer a further report about the revitalization of the Seaport Museum. I am sorry that I cannot be with you today, but I wish you all the best from South Street. 

CAPTAIN JONATHAN BOULWARE
INTERIM PRESIDENT
SOUTH STREET SEAPORT MUSEUM

Hull Lifesaving Museum Seeks Executive Director

Overview:

Hull Lifesaving Museum seeks a passionate, energetic and highly skilled Executive Director to lead the organization into its next phase. HLM has a 36 year record of creating and operating high-quality maritime programming, including historical, educational and social services, based on the legacy of Joshua James and the Point Allerton Lifesaving Station – focusing on the attributes of skills, courage and caring. Current programs include on-the-water youth and adult rowing/educational programs, an intensive case management, educational and job training program for adjudicated youth, and an active collection and exhibits at the museum itself. Programs take place in both Hull and Boston.

Responsibilities:

  • Provide leadership, inspiration, and focus for the organization as a whole.
  • Work with Board members to create support for the organization in the community.
  • Expand Board membership to increase community support.
  • Oversee five senior staff who lead the three core programs, development and finance/administration.
  • Manage the organization’s budget.
  • Act as primary spokesperson for organization.
  • Develop and maintain effective partnerships related to programs.
  • Evaluate program’s accomplishments based on results-driven targets.

Skills and Attributes:

  • Minimum of 10 years results-driven leadership and management experience, particularly in the non-profit sector. Experience in a maritime-related field a plus.
  • Demonstrated skills in consensus and community-building initiatives.
  • Successful experience working with and building an active, engaged board of directors.
  • Excellent oral and written communications skills.
  • Well-developed understanding of the use and value of technology in non-profit operations.

To apply:

Resumes and cover letters describing relevant skills and attributes by 5/20 to Sue Heilman, Interim Executive Director at sue@hulllifesavingmuseum.org