Category Archives: News

NHHC Seeks Museum Curator

This position is located in the Curator Branch, Naval History and Heritage Command (NHHC), at the Washington Navy Yard.  The Curator Branch is responsible for the management of Navy properties of historical and inspirational value, including artifacts, shipboard equipment, ordnance, uniforms, photographs and memorabilia.  This responsibility encompasses acquiring, accessioning, preserving, storing, accounting for and distributing to eligible recipients the properties in the Navy’s historical collection.

For full job announcement see https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/450640900/

Submitted by Jeff Bowdoin, Deputy Head, Curator Branch, Naval History and Heritage Command on September 16, 2016

CAMM Seeks New Administrator

There is still time to apply for this position . . .

CAMM

CAMM is seeking a new administrator. This is a part-time, contract position.

The job objectives include:

1) To facilitate and enhance the performance of CAMM’s board by providing continuity; facilitating communications between Board members and the general membership; and implementing the initiatives of the board and officers.

2) To increase CAMM’s level of service to its members through improved and centralized communications between and among the members and the governing board, facilitating the sharing information and expertise among the membership and opportunities for them to network with their colleagues.

3) To help grow CAMM’s membership through outreach, recruitment and improved levels of service.

For full job description see CAMM Administrator Job Description 2016. Anyone wishing to be considered for this position, should email a resume and cover letter to Greg Gorga, CAMM President, at ggorga@sbmm.org.

Submitted by Greg Gorga, August 17, 2016

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U.S. Lighthouse Society Awards 2016 Preservation Grants

A total of $35,000 was awarded in the second year of the Lighthouse Preservation Grants Program, drawing on the interest from a still-growing investment fund that the U.S. Lighthouse Society has committed to increase through the years so that more and larger preservation grants can be made.

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Morris Island Lighthouse

The Save the Light Foundation in Charleston, S.C., will use a $10,000 grant from the Society’s corporate partner, the SeaPak Division of Rich Products Corp., St. Simons Island, Georgia, to fund a detailed study of the very historic but erosion-threatened and decaying Morris Island Lighthouse.

The Morris Island project was a finalist in this year’s grants program, and was selected by the seafood company for its first program donation. The Charleston group will use the grant to gain a definitive assessment of the condition of the cofferdam-protected lighthouse and determine what steps can be taken, in what order and at what cost, to preserve the structure. International Chimney Corp., movers of the Cape Hatteras Light and other lighthouses, will do the work.

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Spring Point Ledge Lighthouse

A $9,000 grant was awarded to the Spring Point Ledge Lighthouse Trust in Maine to replace the lantern vent ball on the breakwater lighthouse and repair damage in the lantern caused by water intrusion. The entire project will cost $20,700.

On the Great Lakes, the Michigan Lighthouse Conservancy will use a $9,000 grant to complete a $32,375 project to fabricate and install damaged or missing parts of the handrail system in the tower and on the lantern gallery at the Muskegon South Pierhead Lighthouse.

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Muskegon South Pierhead Lighthouse

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Pensacola Lighthouse

A $7,000 grant will be given to the Pensacola Lighthouse Foundation to restore a long-lost iron pedestal to the top of the lighthouse and use it to support a lens that now is suspended from the lantern roof. The pedestal was found a few years ago in the woods near the tower, and has been restored. The grant will go toward the $17,589 project to place it back in its proper location to support the lens and curtail the structural damage caused by the current system.

This year’s grants mark a slight increase from last year’s $31,000 in assistance to efforts to repair the lantern and replace a ventilator ball on the Sentinel Island Lighthouse near Juneau, Alaska; to help replace windows and shutters at the Toledo Harbor Lighthouse in Ohio; and to start work on a detailed plan to restore the masonry basement at Race Rocks Lighthouse in Long Island Sound near New London, Connecticut.

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Boston Harbor Lighthouse

In addition, the Society’s program will administer a second grant from its first corporate preservation partner, the Lands’ End clothing company of Wisconsin. Last year, Lands’ End committed funding to launch the Society’s detailed study of preservation needs at the Alcatraz Island Lighthouse, a Society project in San Francisco Bay. This year, the Society and Lands’ End leaders traveled in late July to Little Brewster Island in Boston Harbor to present an initial $30,000 check to restore the foundation of the Boston Light’s iconic boathouse; the work will allow the boathouse to reopen to the public, and the gift celebrates the 300th anniversary of the country’s first lighthouse.

At this point the Society’s program is open only to not-for-profit groups, with a maximum grant amount of $10,000. As the dedicated preservation fund grows, more grant money will be made available for future projects. Information on donating to the fund or applying for future grants may be found on the Society’s website.

Submitted by Candace Clifford, September 8, 2016

HABS/HAER/HALS Seeks Architects

Two positions have been announced–one for a general project architect and one for a dedicated maritime architect. This position is located in the Heritage Documentation Programs division that includes the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS), Historic American Engineering Record (HAER), and the Historic American Landscapes Survey (HALS) of the National Park Service in Washington,D.C. 

The full announcement and can be found at:

 

Deadline for applications is September 13.

Submitted by Todd Croteau, September 6, 2016

Member Update – ASME Names USS Monitor’s Worthington Pumps an Engineering Landmark

Newport News, VA – The USS Monitor’s Worthington Direct-Acting Simplex Pumps were designated a Historic Mechanical Engineering Landmark by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) in a August 26, 2016, ceremony at The Mariners’ Museum.

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Port Worthington pump during conservation. Photo courtesy of The Mariners’ Museum

“Landmark status for the Worthington simplex pumps recognizes the contribution of the steam pumps to industrial history and to the progress of mechanical engineering,” said K. Keith Roe, current president of ASME.  “The Worthington steam pumps join a roster of more than 250 other ASME engineering landmarks throughout the world.  Each represents a progressive step in the evolution of our profession, while exemplifying the innovation and vision embodied in engineers everywhere.”

Howard H. Hoege III, interim president and CEO of The Mariners’ Museum, said, “We are  distinctly honored to be awarded the ASME Historic Mechanical Engineering Landmark designation for the USS Monitor’s Worthington Pumps. This award is a symbol of the Museum’s role in preserving and presenting unique marine engineering inventions such as the Worthington Pumps, allowing us to inspire future generations to create new designs, technologies, and machines which will shape our world’s future.”

The simplex pumps from the iconic ironclad Monitor were designed by 19th-century engineering pioneer Henry R. Worthington, one of ASME’s co-founders. Worthington, a longtime associate of the Monitor’s designer John Ericsson, sold the pumps, built at Worthington & Baker Works in Greenpoint, New York, on January 10, 1862, for $582.22. They were installed on the Monitor to handle water for boiler, bilge, and fire-fighting needs.

Dr. Reginald I. Vachon, past president of ASME, said, “The Worthington steam pumps stood apart for their efficiency and reliability. Their compact size and lightweight design were vital features in marine applications, and the pumps also served as the basis for a variety of other industrial applications.”

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Photo courtesy of The Mariners’ Museum

Vachon presented a bronze plaque to John V. Quarstein, director of the Monitor Center, and Dr. Paul Ticco, regional coordinator of the Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, at the August 25 ceremony. Guests were given behind-the-scenes laboratory tours led by Monitor Center conservators.

Recovered from the Monitor’s wreck site off Cape Hatteras, NC, in 2001 by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and U.S. Navy divers, the pumps are believed to be the oldest surviving examples of Worthington’s simplex design. Undergoing conservation at the USS Monitor Center’s Batten Conservation Complex at The Mariners’ Museum and Park, the pumps will go on display at the Museum when conservation is complete.

The Monitor Center has crafted the only fully operational replica of one of the ship’s pumps. Will Hoffman, senior conservator/conservation project manager at the Monitor Center, gave a presentation about the making of the replica and a demonstration. Supporters of the Replica Project were recognized including Curtiss-Wright, Master Machine and Tool, and Hampton Rubber Company. Plans are to take the replica on a road tour that follows the Monitor Historic Trail from New York to North Carolina. When not on the road, the replica will be used for “STEAM” educational programming at the Museum.

The August 25 designation ceremony was sponsored by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers-Eastern Virginia Section and Curtiss-Wright.

Submitted by Jenna Dill, Marketing & Communications Manager, The Mariners’ Museum, August 25, 2016

ICMM Newsletter

Have you seen the latest ICMM Newsletter?  The 3rd quarter issue for 2016 contains articles from around the globe . . .

“Asia is well represented by China, Hong Kong and Korea; South America, specifically Chile, has a story about a 19th century naval battle, as well as more news about the 2017 ICMM Congress in Valparaiso; Germany flies the flag for Europe and, of course, the President’s message is from the USA as is another naval story; and from the Pacific, Australia tells a grim story.”

As most of you are aware the next International Congress of Maritime Museums will take place 15-20 October, 2017The 18th Congress will be hosted by the National Maritime Museum, Valparaiso, Chile. More information is available on the ICMM website. The deadline for the Call for Papers is November 17, 2016.

Submitted by Steve White, ICMM President, August 17, 2016.