Call for Papers Now Open for NASOH 2019 Annual Conference in New Bedford, MA

CALL FOR PAPERS
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Connecting the Global and Local: The Sea and Maritime Cities

North American Society for Oceanic History
National Maritime Historical Society
New Bedford Whaling Museum
New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park
New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center
2019 Annual Conference
New Bedford, Massachusetts

Connecting the Global and Local: The Sea and Maritime Citiesthe 45th Conference of the North American Society for Oceanic History held jointly with the National Maritime Historical Society and co-hosted by the New Bedford Whaling Museum, New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park and New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center will be held in New Bedford, Massachusetts, May 15-18, 2019.

The city of New Bedford, Massachusetts is a vibrant nexus in oceanic, maritime, and coastal history that has few parallels in North America.  Though possessing immense cultural weight through its association with American whaling industry and Herman Melville’sMoby Dick, New Bedford’s maritime history did not begin or end with whaling.  In the second decade of the 21st Century, the city remains the nation’s most valuable fishing port and more than 5,000 people are employed in port-related jobs.  Employment opportunities and the openness of the maritime sectors to immigrant laborers from the whaling era to the present have led to a racially and culturally diverse city and population with enduring ties to Portugal, the Azores, Cape Verde, Norway, and the Atlantic Maritimes. More recently immigrants from Vietnam, Mexico and Central America have found work in the fishing industry.  This is readily apparent in aspects of everyday life such as food ways, ethnic clubs and small businesses.  Centuries of dependence on the unforgiving sea fostered the creation of maritime charities, medical and other social service institutions such as the famous Seamen’s Bethel & Mariners Home and the still active Shaw Fund for Mariner’s Children.  Multicultural in its composition, global in its historical connections with the sea, New Bedford captures maritime North American in all its dimensions.

We are looking forward to meeting in New Bedford, whose past and present are intertwined with the sea. Under the conference theme Connecting the Global and Local: The Sea and Maritime Cities, the program committee invites submissions of individual papers and full sessions (preferring panels with three papers) that identify and explore the dynamic social, cultural, environmental, economic and physical spaces that connects city sea.  Submissions on other topics in maritime history, archaeology and culture are also welcome.  Session and individual paper proposals should include: A) title, not to exceed 10 words; B) abstract, not to exceed 250 words; C) a 200-word bio for the presenter; D) contact information including phone number, address, affiliation, and email. Please submit this information as a single Word document, single-spaced, 12-point Times Roman font, and not as a PDF.  Accommodations for PowerPoint presentations will be provided; any other requirements, including audio-visual equipment, special outlets, or accommodations for disabilities should be included in the proposal. Please note that all participants must register for the conference.

Students may apply for a Chad Smith Travel Grant to assist in travel to present a paper at the conference. Additionally, each year NASOH bestows the Clark G. Reynolds Student Paper Award to the author of the best graduate student paper delivered at the conference. Please see the awards section of the NASOH website for details.

The deadline for proposal submission is February 1, 2019. Please submit proposal packets electronically to the Program Committee atNASOH2019CFP@gmail.com.

NASOH members and anyone interested in serving as panel chairs should send an email to the Program Committee at the same address.

Program Committee Members:
John Jensen, University of West Florida, Co-chair
Kurt Knoerl, Georgia Southern University, Armstrong Campus
Victor Mastone, Board of Underwater Archaeological Resources, Co-chair
Calvin Mires, Bridgewater State University
Laura Orleans, New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center

Deadline for CAMM Conference Paper Proposals is December 3. Please Join Us in Wisconsin April 24-26, 2019

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Please consider submitting a paper proposal for the 2019 CAMM Annual Conference this April 24-26, 2019 in Manitowoc, Wisconsin, located on beautiful Lake Michigan between the port cities of Milwaukee and Green Bay.  Join us in helping our host this year, the Wisconsin Maritime Museum, celebrate its 50th anniversary of the museum, and the 75th anniversary of the commissioning of the USS Cobia, the WWII submarine at the center of the museum’s collection.   Together with our conference committee, Wisconsin Maritime Museum is putting together a fantastic event – packed with opportunities to learn from our peers and experience the rich maritime history of Wisconsin and the Great Lakes.

Click here to download the 2019 CAMM Conference Proposal Form Please save the form and email to Cathy Green, CAMM Administrator, at: maritimemuseums@gmail.com , or print and mail or fax the form to her attention at: 75 Maritime Drive, Manitowoc, Wisconsin 54220 (fax 920-684-0219)

Deadline for submission is December 3, 2018. You will receive a response from the program committee no later than December 15, 2018.

Themes and topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Navigating Change in the 21st Century – Maritime Museums of Today and Tomorrow
  • New Exhibitions, New Research, New History
  • Education & Programs
  • Collections and Curatorial Management
  • New Technologies – Digital Interactives, Social Media, Marketing, Data Capture
  • Governance – Engaging Boards, Staff, Volunteers, and Stakeholders
  • Failure Studies & Lessons Learned – Panelists to Continue the Conversation
  • Accessibility, Inclusive Programming, and Diversity in Museums
  • Great Lakes specific topics

REGISTRATION: Will open January 2019

EVENTS: In addition to conference sessions held at the Wisconsin Maritime Museum, all tours and special events are included with full conference registration, including:

  • Tuesday evening reception at the museum’s rooftop beer garden
  • Wednesday afternoon tour of local ship yard, Burger Boat
  • Thursday USS Cobia and behind the scenes museum tours
  • Friday evening banquet
  • Saturday optional Door County maritime landscape bus tour (lighthouses, museums, shipyards!)

Please visit the CAMM Conference Webpage for more information including lodging and travel options.

We hope to see you in Manitowoc, Wisconsin this spring.

San Francisco Maritime National Park Association WWII Vessels Celebrate 75th Anniversary

Many of our CAMM Member Institutions are stewards for WWII era vessels.  If you have a story featuring commemorative events or anniversaries, please submit them for inclusion in the CAMM blog. The below is an article by Carl Nolte submitted by the San Francisco Maritime National Historical Park.

There are beautiful places in America and there are historic places as well. The northern San Francisco waterfront is both. At the foot of Russian Hill within sight of the Golden Gate is the San Francisco Maritime National Historical Park with an unmatched collection of historic ships from the age of sail—and steamships as well from a later time.

Just east of the Maritime Park, at the salt water edge of the famous Fisherman’s Wharf, are two other vessels, both dating from World War II and both marking their 75th anniversary in 2018.

Pampanito on sea trials of Hunters Point Naval Shipyard taken during the Spring of 1945.

USS Pampanito. (photo, Maritime Park Association)

One is the submarine Pampanito, which had a distinguished record in the Pacific in World War II. The other is the cargo ship Jeremiah O’Brien, which carried troops, guns and ammunition to the allied forces in Europe and the Pacific. The Pampanito sailed on six war patrols and was part of one of the most remarkable incidents in the war. The O’Brien is a veteran of the D-Day invasion.

Both ships are painted gray, both served in wartime; both are memorials to that time. But they are also different: the O’Brien carried Navy sailors to man her defensive guns, but she was a civilian ship, a proud representative of the American Merchant Marine. The Pampanito was a navy warship, built to sink other ships.

“The hunter and the prey — but on the same side,’’ said Matt Lasher, the executive director of the National Liberty Ship Memorial, which owns and operates the O’Brien.

It is an interesting paradox: The O’Brien was one of the cargo ships built to win the battle of  the Atlantic against German submarines. The Pampanito was built to sink Japanese ships and help win the battle in the Pacific. The Americans
built ships faster than
the Germans could sink them. At the same time, we sank ships faster than the Japanese could build them. That’s industrial power.

Both vessels were built in 1943; the Pampanito at the Portsmouth Navy Yard  in New Hampshire, the O’Brien at a civilian shipyard in Portland, Maine, only a few miles away.

Both are examples of an amazing American industrial miracle. The O’Brien, one of more than 2,700 nearly identical Liberty Ships, was built in 52 days. Since a submarine is a much more complicated vessel, the Pampanito took longer.

She was ready for sea eight months after the first steel was laid for her keel. On March 15, 1944 — exactly a year after construction began — the submarine sailed from Pearl Harbor on her first war patrol.

San Francisco became the last port — and eventually the home port — for both vessels. The submarine was overhauled, after a long patrol, at the Hunters Point Naval Shipyard in the summer of 1945. Once the war ended, she was decommissioned that December. Not long afterward, the O’Brien steamed in the Golden Gate from Australia, carrying general cargo — and six Australian war brides. Both ships were laid up — the Pampanito as a reserve vessel at Mare Island and the O’Brien at the reserve fleet — the so-called “Mothball Fleet” — on nearby Suisun Bay.

The submarine was finally stricken from the Navy roles in 1971 and turned over to the non-profit Maritime Park Association, and after some delays was opened as a floating war memorial in 1982 at Pier 45 in San Francisco.

The O’Brien languished in the backwaters of Suisun Bay for 33 years until she was rescued by the newly formed National Liberty Ship Memorial led by retired Rear Admiral Thomas Patterson in 1979.

The O’Brien, which has been kept operational, went on display in San Francisco in 1980.

Both vessels made history. On one of its war patrols, the Pampanito sank a Japanese transport in the South China sea. Unknown to the submarine’s crew, the ship was part of a convoy carrying war cargo—and Australian and British prisoners of war bound for slave labor camps in Japan. The submarine resued 73 of these prisoners. Admiral Chester Nimitz called it “one of the most sensational stories of the war.’’

Four books have been written about this submarine, and she has appeared in at least one movie.

The O’Brien also had her day in sun. The ship made a remarkable post war voyage in 1994, when Admiral Patterson and a crew of volunteers took her back to the Normandy beaches to commemorate the 50th anniversary of D-Day, a voyage that took the old ship half way around the world.

And now both vessels are tied up next to each other, 75 years after they began their service under the American flag.

To learn more about these WWII vessels and thier 75th celebration visit www.maritime.org

Naval History and Heritage Command Staff Curator Position Open

Excerpted from USA Job Announcement for: Staff Curator (Museum Management)

For full details and application information: https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/514642100

Note open dates only 10/25/18 to 10/29/18 (Today!)

GS-11, full-time, permanent position, located in Washington DC

Summary
You will serve as the Collection Data Manager in the Curator Branch of NAVAL HISTORY AND HERITAGE COMMAND. Curator Branch manages the headquarters historic artifact collection and the Command-wide collections management database, EMu. Curator Branch establishes the Command-wide standards for data entry and use of the database.

Responsibilities

  • You will be responsible for the maintenance and management of the collections data stored in Department of the Navy Heritage Asset Management System/Department of the Navy Collections Management System (DONCOMS).
  • You will ensure that all registry settings are correctly functioning, standardized data fields are established, and work with stakeholders to identify data standardization and user training requirements.
  • You will serve as the staff expert in the use of the collections management database, working closely with the IT staff responsible for the technical maintenance of the system.
  • You will assist the Registrar with artifact inventories, ensuring that all procedures maximize the capabilities of DONCOMS.
  • You will be responsible for reviewing data to be imported into the collection management database and successfully completing those imports.
  • You will provide training for users appropriate to their user group permissions.

Travel Required

Occasional travel – You may be expected to travel for this position.

Save the Date – March 13-15, 2019 1st World Congress on Maritime Heritage: Connecting with the Past to Navigate the Future

Please Save the Date to attend the 1st World Congress on Maritime Heritage taking place in Singapore, March 13-15, 2019.

In 2015, the United Nations (UN) established the 2030 UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and set an ambitious agenda for the world. According to the International Maritime Organization (IMO) many if not all of these goals will be delivered from the ocean.

What is the 1st World Congress on Maritime Heritage?

The Congress will initiate a coordinated effort to communicate the importance of our maritime heritage and current maritime endeavors. It will bring together a diverse global array of maritime stakeholders, and provide a unique opportunity for all to form new partnerships towards achieving a common objective: securing a sustainable future through better understanding of our common maritime heritage.


A List of Speakers can be found here.

Program Highlights Include:

  • Sharing Global Perspectives of Our Shared Maritime Heritage
  • Defining and Understanding the Views and Evolution of Stakeholders in a Changing World
  • Exploring new Maritime Heritage connections, opportunities and strategies within regions for helping to support a sustainable future

    Topics will be delivered via keynote addresses, panel discussions and presentations.

Who Should Attend this Congress:

  • All elements of the Maritime Industries Sector
  • Historians, archaeologists, geographers, economists, and other scholars that study humans and the ocean and Academic Institutions
  • Maritime museums and aquariums that interpret the human relationship to the ocean
  • Port cities, places and communities connected to the ocean

For any inquiries, please contact WCMH2019@worldexpress.com.sg 

Call for Paper Proposals Now Open for CAMM 2019 Conference

Hello CAMM Members and Friends,WMM Logo Small

Please consider submitting a paper proposal for the 2019 CAMM Annual Conference this April 24-26, 2019 in Manitowoc, Wisconsin, located on beautiful Lake Michigan between the port cities of Milwaukee and Green Bay.  Join us in helping our host this year, the Wisconsin Maritime Museum, celebrate its 50th anniversary of the museum, and the 75th anniversary of the commissioning of the USS Cobia, the WWII submarine at the center of the museum’s collection.   Together with our conference committee, Wisconsin Maritime Museum is putting together a fantastic event – packed with opportunities to learn from our peers and experience the rich maritime history of Wisconsin and the Great Lakes.

Click here to download the 2019 CAMM Conference Proposal Form Please save the form and email to Cathy Green, CAMM Administrator, at: maritimemuseums@gmail.com , or print and mail or fax the form to her attention at: 75 Maritime Drive, Manitowoc, Wisconsin 54220 (fax 920-684-0219)

Deadline for submission is December 3, 2018. You will receive a response from the program committee no later than December 15, 2018.

Themes and topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Navigating Change in the 21st Century – Maritime Museums of Today and Tomorrow
  • New Exhibitions, New Research, New History
  • Education & Programs
  • Collections and Curatorial Management
  • New Technologies – Digital Interactives, Social Media, Marketing, Data Capture
  • Governance – Engaging Boards, Staff, Volunteers, and Stakeholders
  • Failure Studies & Lessons Learned – Panelists to Continue the Conversation
  • Accessibility, Inclusive Programming, and Diversity in Museums
  • Great Lakes specific topics

REGISTRATION: Will open January 2019

EVENTS: In addition to conference sessions held at the Wisconsin Maritime Museum, all tours and special events are included with full conference registration, including:

  • Tuesday evening reception at the museum’s rooftop beer garden
  • Wednesday afternoon tour of local ship yard, Burger Boat
  • Thursday USS Cobia and behind the scenes museum tours
  • Friday evening banquet
  • Saturday optional Door County maritime landscape bus tour (lighthouses, museums, shipyards!)

Please visit the CAMM Conference Webpage for more information including lodging and travel options.

We hope to see you in Manitowoc, Wisconsin this spring.

Ocean Institute raises $70,000 to match state grant for tall ship Spirit of Dana Point engine replacement

Dana Point, CA: The classic tall ship Spirit of Dana Point is an iconic figure along the Southern California coast. For generations of children the ship has served as an unforgettable educational experience in ocean-related science, technology, engineering, art and math (STEAM) disciplines, California maritime history lessons, and team-building skills. Now Spirit, as the ship is fondly referred to by its dedicated volunteers and crew, will receive a new engine as a result of a recent fundraising campaign that has now surpassed its goal.

Spirit of Dana Point photo credit Cliff Wassman

Last June Ocean Institute received notification that it was a successful applicant for a highly competitive grant from the California Cultural and Historical Endowment. The grant for $68,745 was exactly half of the cost to replace the ship’s tired engine. A fundraising drive was immediately launched to raise the necessary matching funds for the ship to enter the shipyard, complete the work, and return to service as an ocean classroom.

“We are so thankful and humbled by the donors who stepped forward with surprisingly generous contributions to make this happen without delay. We received calls from people committing $5,000, $10,000 and $25,000 gifts, and we quickly realized how much Spirit means to so many people,” declared Dan Pingaro, chief executive officer of Ocean Institute.

Donors include Tom and Grace Lieblein who said, “We truly believe in the mission of the Ocean Institute, and have a passion for the tall ships and their critical role in the institute. Spirit’s new engine will ensure that it continues supporting Ocean Institute education programs.”

Spirit will head to Marine Group Boat Works on San Diego Bay, CA in late October where a new, low emissions John Deere 265 horsepower Tier 3 marine diesel engine will be installed. Herb Engel, CEO of Marine Group Boat Works stated, “We take pride in our commitment for supporting green initiatives that allow both industry and communities to stay on the forefront of conservation. Working with Ocean Institute to repower its tall ship to achieve their conservation and education goals is something that our employees will be proud to accomplish. This is a very special ship.”

Spirit of Dana Point is a traditionally-built replica of a 1770’s privateer schooner used during the American Revolution. Embodying the expert craftsmanship of historian and shipwright Dennis Holland, the ship was built in Orange County and launched in 1983. Formerly Pilgrim of Newport, this 118-foot schooner has proven to be an excellent teaching platform. The ship is a rare example of a once robust fleet of California tall ships representing the state’s maritime, economic and cultural heritage. Each year more than 5,600 students embark on Spirit for educational voyages, including underserved children who do not have access to the ocean.

About Ocean Institute
Ocean Institute is a highly respected ocean science, maritime history and experiential education nonprofit located in Dana Point Harbor. This modern waterfront campus is adjacent to a federally-protected Marine Life Conservation Area, and encompasses 33,000 square feet of hands-on exhibits, science labs and a live collection of 1,100 specimens of local marine life within 92 aquariums. Central to its unique identity throughout California and essential to its experiential mission, Ocean Institute operates two impressive tall ships. Spirit of Dana Point is a 118-foot schooner, and Pilgrim is a 130-foot square rigged brig built in 1945 in Denmark. Pilgrim is a replica of the ship made famous by Richard Henry Dana Jr. in his epic memoir “Two Years Before the Mast”, that chronicled his 1830’s journey along the California coast. Ocean Institute also operates the 70-foot research vessel R/V Sea Explorer.

Over forty years, Ocean Institute has impacted the lives of two million California students with this mission statement: “using the ocean as our classroom, we inspire children to learn.” Ocean Institute has mastered a continuum of structured academic programs for students from elementary through high school, and inspires over 100,000 students and the general public each year to learn with a hands-on approach to ocean-related science, research and conservation. Ocean Institute’s program inventory is based on STEM principles aligned with California education standards. To learn more or become a member, visit www.oceaninstitute.org.

For questions, please contact: Dan Goldbacher, Director, Ocean Institute Maritime Programs, dgoldbacher@oceaninstitute.org  949.496.2274 x 615